WRITTEN BY

Jonas @howwedu


CATEGORY

app, project 1

 

Today's activities

  • Start the fast audio and read along with the German text, try to understand first parts of it.
  • Now listen to the slow audio and check your understanding with the English translation.
  • Start to speak! Pick 3-4 sentences and speak in chorus with the native speaker, first with the fast, then with the slow audio recording.
  • Do the gap-fill and listening exercises (and read the notes).
    10 minutes studying (+5 minutes reading

Did you know? The notes are our way to teach grammar and to draw your attention to certain words and structures. They are completely optional. If it fits your learning type, though, you should have the opportunity to understand on a more theoretical level the rules of the German language. We have designed the notes to explain to you the new rules by exploring the texts you've just worked with: Every explanation refers to examples right from the daily app, and of course, all are clickable. Our recommendation: give the notes a try and read them, but never try to learn them by heart - focus on the examples, i.e. the app to study efficiently!


Parallel Text

The following transcript is clickable. Click on any sentence to jump to that point in the video. When the video runs, the current part will be highlighted in both the parallel text and the ↑ decoding above to facilitate comparison of the different translations when you want to jump back and forth. Click to hide.

Die Frau heißt Anne.

Anne hat ein Haus.

Es ist hier.

Anne geht in das Haus.

Sie ist allein in dem/im Haus.

Sie bleibt in dem/im Haus.

Du hast ein Haus.

Max, du und ich gehen in das Haus.

Wenn Max und ich gehen,

bist du allein im Haus.

Ich gehe.

Max geht.

Du bleibst allein im Haus.

The woman’s name is Anne.

Anne has (got) a house.

It is here.

Anne goes into the house.

She is alone in the house.

She stays in the house.

You have (got) a house.

Max, you and I go into the house.

When Max and I leave,

you are alone in the house.

I leave.

Max leaves.

You stay alone in the house.

 

Listening and Writing

click to listen - fill in the gap - click again and speak in chorus with the native speaker.

Anne hat ein Haus.

Anne geht in das Haus.

Sie ist allein in dem/im Haus.

Du hast ein Haus.

Max, du und ich gehen in das Haus.

Wenn Max und ich gehen,

bist du allein im Haus.

Ich gehe.

Max geht.

Du bleibst allein im Haus.

Translating and Writing

Fill in the gap, then click the English sentence and speak in chorus with the native speaker.

The woman’s name is Anne.
Die Frau heißt Anne.

It is here.
Es ist hier.

Anne goes into the house.
Anne geht in das Haus.

She is alone in the house.
Sie ist allein in dem/im Haus.

She stays in the house.
Sie bleibt in dem/im Haus.

You have (got) a house.
Du hast ein Haus.

When Max and I leave,
Wenn Max und ich gehen,

you are alone in the house.
bist du allein im Haus.

I leave.
Ich gehe.

Max leaves.
Max geht.

You stay alone in the house.
Du bleibst allein im Haus.

notes 1

Basic Word Order

Note that like in English, the word order in the most simple sentences is

subjectverb(–object), e.g. I am learning German.

Die Frau heißt Anne.
Sie ist allein in dem/im Haus.
Sie bleibt in dem/im Haus.

The woman’s name is Anne.
She is alone in the house.
She stays in the house.

Genders of nouns

Note that in German there are several articles for English the and a. These articles correspond to one of three genders.

ein Garten –  a garden (masculine)

eine Frau – a woman (feminine)

ein Haus – a house (neuter)

der Garten –  der garden (masculine)

die Frau – die woman (feminine)

das Haus – das house (neuter)

For nouns referring to persons, the gender of the word corresponds to the person’s sex (except for a/the girl – ein/das Mädchen (neuter)). For other things, gender assignment seems relatively arbitrary on a logical level. There are however many patterns in the word structure that facilitate learning, e.g. all nouns ending in -chen are neuter, all in –tion are feminine and so forth. It can be worthwhile to have a look at these patterns when you know some more vocabulary that you can apply them to. 

Remember that all German nouns are capitalized.

Verbs in the Present

Note that verbs in the singular usually have the following endings.

ich gehe – I go.

du gehst – you go

er/sie/es geht – he/she/it goes

Ich gehe.

I leave.

               

Du bleibst allein im Haus.
Du hast ein Haus.

You stay alone in the house.
You have (got) a house.

               

Die Frau heißt Anne.
Anne hat ein Haus.
Es ist hier. 
Anne geht in das Haus.
Sie ist allein in dem/im Haus.
Sie bleibt in dem/im Haus.

The woman’s name is Anne.
Anne has (got) a house.
It is here.
Anne goes into the house.
She is alone in the house.
She stays in the house.

The Cases

There are four different cases (forms) for German articles and nouns, depending on whether the noun they belong to is the subject or the object of the sentence (I vs. German in I am learning German).

They are:

1.        the nominative – who/what?

the form of the subject: I give the book to Annie.

2.        the genitive – whose/of what?

indicating possession: My parent’s house.

3.        the dative – whom/to who?

the form of the indirect object: I give the book to Annie.

4.       the accusative – who/what?

the form of the direct object: I give the book to Annie.

Moreover, some prepositions are always followed by a certain case.

das Haus – the house (nominative)

in dem Haus – in the house (dative)

Not every case of a word is necessarily different (e.g. the nouns in the singular usually stay the same in nominative, dative and accusative).

Sie ist allein in dem/im Haus.

She is alone in the house.

im

Note that in dem (in the) is usually contracted to im (dem is dative singular of das).

Sie ist allein in dem/im Haus.

She is alone in the house.

image attribution: Caroline https://www.flickr.com/photos/hills_alive/4973573380

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