WRITTEN BY

Jonas @howwedu


CATEGORY

app, project 1

 

Today's activities

  • Listen to the fast audio and read the German text. From time to time, pause and compare with the English translation.
    3 minutes listening
  • Speak the entire text twice in chorus with the slow audio. Then pick 3-5 sentence and practice them with the fast audio recording.
    8 minutes speaking
  • Do the listening and translation exercises.
    5 minutes studying
  • Today's notes present interesting information on the particles denn and ja. As usual, focus on the examples.
    5 minutes

Did you know? The howwedu notes use unified color coding for cases and genders to make the explanations easier to follow.

Parallel Text

Use the player buttons to switch between fast and slow audio recordings. The following transcript is clickable. Click on any sentence to jump to that point in the video. Click to hide.

Petra is new in town. Isabelle Müller has invited her to her place.
„(Herzlich) Willkommen in Deutschland!“
„Hallo!“
„Wie heißt du?“
„Ich heiße Petra.
Wie heißt du?“
„Ich heiße Isabelle. Woher kommst du?“
Stille. Petra schweigt.
„Kommst du aus Deutschland?“
Petra nickt.
„Ist dir langweilig?“
„Ja, ein bisschen.“
Petra und Isabelle gehen aus dem Haus und in den Garten.
„Dein Garten ist ja ein… Dschungel!“
Petra freut sich. Isabelle hat ein Haustier. Ihr Haustier ist eine alte Katze, Mala. Sie sitzt im Garten. Petra sieht die Katze. Petra freut sich, denn sie freut sich immer, wenn sie eine Katze sieht.
„Da ist eine Katze!
Ist sie immer hier?“
„Ja! Das ist meine Katze. Sie ist mein Haustier. Sie wohnt hier! Hier ist sie zu Hause.“
„Und ich? Kann ich hier wohnen?“
„Du kannst hier wohnen, wenn du eine Katze bist. Bist du denn eine Katze?“
„Ja!“
„Mmm…“ „Dann kannst du hier wohnen. Und du bekommst das Haus, wenn ich alt bin.“
Isabelle nods sympathetically, then calls the doctor and has Petra committed to psychiatric care.

„Bist du immer noch zu Hause?“
„Ja…“
„Kommst du?“
„Nein.“

Mir geht es gut.
Dir ist langweilig.
Ihm geht es gut.
Ihr ist langweilig.
Ihm ist geht es gut.
Uns ist langweilig.
Euch geht es gut.
Ihnen ist langweilig.

An advertising slogan
Sicher wohnen. Wie man gut und sicher wohnt.

Petra is new in town. Isabelle Müller has invited her to her place.
“Welcome to Germany!"
"Hello!"
"What's your name?"
"My name is Petra.
What's your name?"
"My name is Isabelle. Where are you from?"
Silence. Petra is quiet.
"Are you from Germany?"
Petra nods.
"Are you bored?"
"Yes, a bit."
Petra and Isabelle walk [/go] out of the house and into the garden.
"Your garden is like … a jungle! {positive surprise} "
Petra is delighted. Isabelle has a pet. Her pet is an old cat, (named) Mala. She is sitting in the garden. Petra sees the cat. Petra is happy, because [/for] she always is when she sees a cat.
"There's a cat!
Is it always here?"
"Yes! That’s my cat. She's my pet. She lives here! This is her home. [/Here she is at home.]"
"And I? Can I live here?"
"You can live here, if you are a cat. Are you {doubtful/surprised} a cat?"
"Yes!"
“Mmm…” “Then you can live here. And you’ll get the house, when I am old."
Isabelle nods sympathetically, then calls the doctor and has Petra committed to psychiatric care.

“Are you still at home?”
“Yes.”
“Are you coming?”
“No.”

I am fine. [To-me goes it good.]
You are bored. [To-me (it) is boring.]
He is fine.
She is bored.
It (e.g. the animal) is fine.
We are bored.
You [plural] are fine.
They are bored.

An advertising slogan
Living safely. How to live well and safely.
 

Listening and Writing

click to listen - fill in the gap - click again and speak in chorus with the native speaker.

„(Herzlich) Willkommen in Deutschland!“

„Wie heißt du?“

„Ich heiße Petra.

Woher kommst du?“

Kommst du aus Deutschland?“

Petra und Isabelle gehen aus dem Haus und in den Garten.

Ihr Haustier ist eine alte Katze, Mala.

„Da ist eine Katze!

Und ich? Kann ich hier wohnen?“

„Bist du immer noch zu Hause?“

Mir geht es gut.

Dir ist langweilig.

Translating and Writing

Fill in the gap, then click the English sentence and speak in chorus with the native speaker.

What's your name?"
Wie heißt du?“

Silence. Petra is quiet.
Stille. Petra schweigt.

Petra and Isabelle walk [/go] out of the house and into the garden.
Petra und Isabelle gehen aus dem Haus und in den Garten.

"Your garden is like … a jungle! {positive surprise} "
„Dein Garten ist ja ein… Dschungel!“

Petra is happy, because [/for] she always is
Petra freut sich, denn sie freut sich immer,

when she sees a cat.
wenn sie eine Katze sieht.

Is it always here?"
Ist sie immer hier?“

"And I? Can I live here?"
„Und ich? Kann ich hier wohnen?“

when I am old."
wenn ich alt bin.“

“Are you coming?”
Kommst du?“

I am fine. [To-me goes it good.]
Mir geht es gut.

You are bored. [To-me (it) is boring.]
Dir ist langweilig.

He is fine.
Ihm geht es gut.

She is bored.
Ihr ist langweilig.

It (e.g. the animal) is fine.
Ihm ist geht es gut.

We are bored.
Uns ist langweilig.

You [plural] are fine.
Euch geht es gut.

They are bored.
Ihnen ist langweilig.

notes 3

Particle Party. denn – interest, impatience, doubt, surprise

Note that denn in the sense of For (causal) is usually only used in the written language.

Petra freut sich, denn sie freut sich immer, wenn sie eine Katze sieht.

Petra is happy, because [/for] she always is when she sees a cat.

In spoken German, denn is very frequent as a particle that expresses interest, impatience, doubt or surprise in questions.

„Du kannst hier wohnen, wenn du eine Katze bist.
Bist du denn eine Katze?“

"You can live here, if you are a cat.
Are you {doubtful/surprised} a cat?"

Example from the project text:

„Hallo, woher kommst du denn? Wie heißt du?“

“Hello, where are you from {surprised}? What’s your name?”

PP. ja – surprise

Similar to denn, the particle ja (yes) can express positive surprise in sentences (not questions).

„Dein Garten ist ja ein… Dschungel!“

“Your garden is like … a jungle! {positive surprise}”

The Dative

The dative is case of nouns, pronouns and articles that either answers the question to whom? or is introduced by a certain preposition such as aus (out of) or in (in). Read the following sentences that use the dative.

Petra und Isabelle gehen aus dem Haus und in den Garten.

Petra and Isabelle walk [/go] out of the house and into the garden.

aus dem Garten, aus der Frau, aus dem Haus, im Garten, in der Frau, im Haus

(masculine, feminine, neuter; out oft he garden, out oft he woman, out of the house, in the garden, in(side) the woman, in(side) the house)

Change in WO. Mir geht es gut.

When objects in a sentence are of special importance, they can be highlighted by putting them at the beginning of the sentence. For personal pronouns in the spoken language this is only common for very simple sentences such as “Mir ist langweilig.” or “Mir geht es gut.”.

Mir geht es gut.
Dir ist (es) langweilig.
Ihm geht es gut.
Ihr ist langweilig.
Ihm ist geht es gut.
Uns ist langweilig.
Euch geht es gut.
Ihnen ist langweilig.

I am fine. [To-me goes it good.]
You are bored. [To-me (it) is boring.]
He is fine.
She is bored.
It (e.g. the animal) is fine.
We are bored.
You [plural] are fine.
They are bored.

in or into?

When German in is used in the sense of the English into (direction) it is followed by the the accusative. To indicate a place or location, i.e. when in English you cannot translate it to into, but just in or inside, it needs to be followed by the dative.

Petra und Isabelle gehen aus dem Haus und in den Garten.

Petra and Isabelle go out of the house and into the garden.

Ich bin im Garten. Ich gehe in den Garten. Ich bin im Haus. Ich gehe in das/ins Haus.

I’m in the garden. I go into the garden. I am in the house. I go into the house.

Adjective Forms

Adjectives that precede nouns have certain have endings that correspond to the form of the noun (number, gender and case).

Ihr Haustier ist eine alte Katze, Mala.

Her pet is an old cat, Mala.

Der große Garten/die große Frau/das große Haus ist hier. (nominative)

The big garden/the tall woman/the big house is here.

Ich bin im großen Garten/in der großen Frau/in dem großen Haus. (dative)

I am in the big garden/in the tall woman/in the big house.

Ich gehe in den großen Garten/in die große Frau/in das große Haus. (accussative)

I go into the big garden/into the big woman/into the big house.

The Possessive Articles

mein (my), dein (your) and ihr (her; also: their) are three of several possessive articles which indicate possession or belonging.

Dein Garten ist ja ein… Dschungel!“
„Ja! Das ist meine Katze. Sie ist mein Haustier.
Ihr Haustier ist eine alte Katze, Mala.

“Your garden is like … a jungle! {positive surprise}”
“Yes! That’s my cat. She's my pet.
Her pet is an old cat, Mala.

Read through the complete of the possessive articles (in the nominative) twice:

mein Garten
dein Garten
sein Garten
ihr Garten
sein Garten
unser Garten
euer Garten
ihr Garten

my garden
your garden
his garden
her garden
its garden
our garden
your [plural] garden
their garden

WO. Inversion after Adverbials of Time: Dann… (then)

Note that with some conjunctions like dann the sentence structure changes:

Ich gehe.  Dann gehst du.

I go. Then you’ll go [go you].

Subject and verb are inverted. This also happens when sentences start with other adverbials of time (Today… /Later…/…) or place (There…/Here…/In Berlin…).

„Dann kannst du hier wohnen.

“Then you can live here.

image attribution: Mike Mozart https://www.flickr.com/photos/jeepersmedia/14958031238/

Don't miss any new course material:
get notified when new session or project texts are uploaded

Comments