WRITTEN BY

Jonas @howwedu


CATEGORY

app, project 1

 

Today's activities

  • Challenge yourself and get immediate feedback: Listen to the fast audio recording and try to understand as much as possible. Pause every 4-5 sentences or so to read through the German text and its translation. Start now and use the sidebar to get back to the instructions.
    4 minutes listening and checking
  • Now it's time for speaking! Read along once with the slow audio recording. Even in the case of minor uncertainties about what is being said, take your time, pause the recording, and have a close look at the translation. [Partial decodings in square brackets] give you helpful hints when you have difficulties with the German sentence structure. Pick 3-5 sentences and practice them alternately with the fast and the slow recording.
    5-8 minutes speaking
  • Do the listening and translation exercises. If you're up for another challenge, use the fast audio for the listening exercise!
    6 minutes studying
  • Today's notes are a great opportunity to learn more about how deep you want to dive into German grammar. They will start with some basic information about Sie, the polite way to say du and finish with some very detailed informaton about word order. Don't spend too much time trying to understand grammar explanations, look at them with a critical eye and find out how much they actually help you. If all the notes do is draw your attention to notable sentences in the apps and make you repeat them more often, they have served their purpose.
    4-5 minutes reading and speaking

Did you know? You can switch from fast to slow and vice-versa while the audio is playing!

Parallel Text

Use the player buttons to switch between fast and slow audio recordings. The following transcript is clickable. Click on any sentence to jump to that point in the video. Click to hide.

Eine große Frau und eine süße, alte Katze sitzen im Garten. Die Frau lacht. Sie freut sich.
„Hey! Hallo!“
Die süße, alte Katze sieht die Frau.
„Servus, guten Morgen!“
„Wie geht es dir, Katze?“
„Mir geht es gut. Und dir? Wie geht es dir denn?“
„Mir ist langweilig. Kannst du kommen?“
Stille. Die Katze schweigt.
„Nein! Ich bleibe hier. Tschüss!“
Die Frau nickt: „Auf Wiedersehen, und bis bald im… Dschungel!“

„Guten Morgen, Frau Schmidt! Sind Sie allein?“
„Morgen! Ja, ich bin heute mit meinem Haustier, meiner Katze Elly allein zu Hause.“
„Ich gehe in den Garten.“
„Oh, ich komme.“
Frau Müller geht zu Frau Schmidt, denn zu Hause ist ihr immer ein bisschen langweilig, wenn sie allein ist. Frau Schmidt und Frau Müller sitzen im Garten. Der Garten ist groß. Eine Frau kommt. Sie heißt Laura Hook und hat ein Haustier.
„Guten Abend, Frau Hook, äh… Laura! Bleiben Sie, äh… bleibst du hier?“
„Grüß Gott/Servus!
Nein, ich gehe. Bleibt ihr noch?“
„Ah okay, ja, wir bleiben noch ein bisschen. Sie sind, nein du bist immer herzlich willkommen.“
„Das freut mich! Dann bis später!“

Das freut mich.
Das freut dich.
Das freut ihn.
Das freut sie.
Das freut es.
Das freut uns.
Das freut euch.
Das freut sie.

Ich freue mich.
Du freust dich.
Er freut sich.
Sie freut sich.
Es freut sich.
Wir freuen uns.
Ihr freut euch.
Sie freuen sich.

A tall woman and a sweet, old cat are sitting in the garden. The woman laughs. She is happy.
“Hey! Hallo!”
The sweet old cat sees the woman.
“Hello [Southern Germany], good morning!”
“How are you, cat?”
“I'm fine. And you? How are you doing {pretended interest}?”
“I'm bored. Can you come ?”
Silence. The cat remains quiet.
“No! I'll stay here. Bye!”
The woman nods. “Goodbye, and see you soon in… the jungle!”

“Good morning, Ms. Schmidt! Are you alone?”
“Morning! Yes, I'm alone at home today with my pet, my cat Elly.”
“I’ll go into the garden.”
“I will come along.”
Ms. Müller visits [/goes to} Ms. Schmidt because she is a bit bored at home [/for at she is a bit bored] when she is alone. Ms. Schmidt and Ms. Müller are sitting in the garden. The garden is big. A woman approaches [/comes]. Her name is Laura Hook and she has a pet.
“Good evening, Ms. Hook, uh… Laura! Will you stay {formal}, uh… are you {informal} staying?”
“Hello (Southern Germany). No, I'm leaving. Are you going to stay? [/Are you still staying?]”
“Ah okay, yes, we will stay a bit longer [/we stay still a bit]. You are {formal}, no you are {informal} always dearly welcome.”
“I'm glad! See you later then.”

I'm pleased about that. [That makes me happy.]
You are pleased about that.
He is pleased about that.
She is pleased about that.
It is pleased about that.
We are pleased about it.
You [pl.] are pleased about it.
They are pleased about it.

I'm glad. I'm glad. [I make myself happy.]
You are glad.
He is glad.
She is glad.
It is glad.
We are glad.
You [pl.] are glad.
They are glad.

 

Listening and Writing

click to listen - fill in the gap - click again and speak in chorus with the native speaker.

Eine große Frau und eine süße, alte Katze sitzen im Garten.

Sie freut sich.

„Servus, guten Morgen!“

„Wie geht es dir, Katze?“

Kannst du kommen?“

„Nein! Ich bleibe hier.

„Auf Wiedersehen,

Ja, ich bin heute mit meinem Haustier, meiner Katze Elly allein zu Hause.“

Sie sind,

nein du bist immer herzlich willkommen.“

Dann bis später!“

Das freut mich.

Das freut ihn.

Das freut sie.

Das freut uns.

Das freut sie.

Translating and Writing

Fill in the gap, then click the English sentence and speak in chorus with the native speaker.

The woman laughs.
Die Frau lacht.

The sweet old cat sees the woman.
Die süße, alte Katze sieht die Frau.

“I'm fine. And you?
„Mir geht es gut. Und dir?

“I'm bored.
„Mir ist langweilig.

“Good morning, Ms. Schmidt!
„Guten Morgen, Frau Schmidt!

Are you alone?”
Sind Sie allein?“

“I’ll go into the garden.”
„Ich gehe in den Garten.“

because she is a bit bored at home [/for at she is a bit bored]
denn zu Hause ist ihr immer ein bisschen langweilig,

when she is alone.
wenn sie allein ist.

The garden is big.
Der Garten ist groß.

Her name is Laura Hook and she has a pet.
Sie heißt Laura Hook und hat ein Haustier.

“Good evening, Ms. Hook, uh… Laura!
„Guten Abend, Frau Hook, äh… Laura!

Are you going to stay? [/Are you still staying?]”
Bleibt ihr noch?“

“Ah okay, yes, we will stay a bit longer [/we stay still a bit].
„Ah okay, ja, wir bleiben noch ein bisschen.

“I'm glad!
„Das freut mich!

I'm glad. I'm glad. [I make myself happy.]
Ich freue mich.

You are glad.
Du freust dich.

He is glad.
Er freut sich.

She is glad.
Sie freut sich.

We are glad.
Wir freuen uns.

You [pl.] are glad.
Ihr freut euch.

They are glad.
Sie freuen sich.

notes 2

Sie

When you’re talking to adults they don’t know well, Germans use the personal pronouns Sie (both singular and plural “you”). All pronoun and corresponding verb forms are the same as for plural sie (they) but all the pronoun forms are capitalized.

„Guten Morgen, Frau Schmidt! Sind Sie allein?“
Bleiben Sie , äh… bleibst du hier?“
Sie sind , nein du bist immer herzlich willkommen.“

“Good morning, Ms. Schmidt! Are you alone?”
Will you stay {formal}, uh… are you {informal} staying?”
You are {formal}, no you are {informal} always dearly welcome.”

The Reflexive Pronouns

In German, the reflexive pronouns (myself, yourself, …) are the same as the object forms of the personal pronouns (ich, mich, ihn/sie/es, uns, euch, sie (accusative)).

Only the forms of the third persons (both singular and plural) become sich.

Ich freue mich.
Du freust dich.
Er freut sich.
Sie freut sich.
Es freut sich.
Wir freuen uns.
Ihr freut euch.
Sie freuen sich.

I'm glad. I'm glad. [I make myself (me) happy.]
You are glad.
He is glad.
She is glad.
It is glad.
We are glad.
You [pl.] are glad.
They are glad.

Read the sentences again as an example of the conjugation of a regular verb (freuen).

Ich freu e mich.
Du freu st dich.
Er freu t sich.
Sie freu t sich.
Es freu t sich.
Wir freu en uns.
Ihr freu t euch.
Sie freu en sich.

I'm glad. I'm glad. [I make myself (me) happy.]
You are glad.
He is glad.
She is glad.
It is glad.
We are glad.
You [pl.] are glad.
They are glad.

Adjective Forms II

Note that adjectives that are separated from the noun they refer to by a verb are in their basic form (the garden is big), while when preceding the verb their endings are adjusted to the form (number, gender and case ) of the noun, as explained in session 3.

Preceeding the verb:

Eine große Frau und eine süße, alte Katze sitzen im Garten.
Die süße, alte Katze sieht die Frau.
Der große Garten ist hier.

A tall woman and a sweet, old cat are sitting in the garden.
The sweet old cat sees the woman.
The big garden is here.

Separated by a verb (like be, seem, appear, smell, look, taste, …):

Der Garten ist groß.
Die Frau ist groß.
Die Katze ist süß und alt.

The garden is big.
The woman is tall.
The cat is sweet and old.

Wie geht es dir?

Note that the German equivalent of How are you is literally How goes it to-you? and is thus formed with the dative .

„Wie geht es dir , Katze?“
Mir geht es gut. Und dir ? Wie geht es dir denn?“

“How are you today, cat?”
“I'm fine. And you? How are you doing {pretended interest}?”

This is the perfect opportunity to review the dative of the personal pronouns. Just read through the list.

(to-)me: Wie geht es mir ?
(to-)you: Wie geht es dir ?
(to-)him: Wie geht es ihm
(to-)her: Wie geht es ihr ?
(to-)it: Wie geht es ihm ?
(to-)us: Wie geht es uns ?
(to-)you: Wie geht es euch ?
(to-)them: Wie geht es ihnen ?
(to-)you {formal}: Wie geht es Ihnen ?

Mir geht es gut.
Dir geht es gut.
Ihm geht es gut.
Ihr geht es gut.
Ihm geht es gut.
Uns geht es gut.
Euch geht es gut.
Ihnen geht es gut.
Ihnen geht es gut.

Reminder: WO. Inversion after Adverbials (time, place)

Note that the reason for the inversion ihr ist langweilig à ist ihr langweilig is not the conjunction denn but the adverbial zu Hause (at home) at the beginning of the sentence. This is more or less analogous tot he inversion of subject and verb, because we are dealing with an emphasised dative object (ihr) in this case, as described in session 3.

Frau Müller geht zu Frau Schmidt, denn zu Hause ist ihr immer ein bisschen langweilig, wenn sie allein ist.

Ms. Müller visits [/goes to} Ms. Schmidt because she is a bit bored at home [/for at she is a bit bored] when she is  alone.

Ihr ist langweilig. Zu Hause ist ihr langweilig. Denn ihr ist langweilig. Denn zu Hause ist ihr langweilig.

She’s bored. At home she is bored. Because {written only} she is bored. Because {written only} at home she is bored.

The usual position of dative and accusative objects is behind the verb , so you only have to consider the object-verb inversion with sentences like Mir geht es gut or Mir ist langweilig.

image attribution: Monica Arellano-Ongpin https://www.flickr.com/photos/maong/4365683251/

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