WRITTEN BY

Jonas @howwedu


CATEGORY

app, project 1

 

Today's activities

  • Listen to the fast audio recording and read the German text. Pause from time to time to check your understanding using the English translation.
    3 minutes listening and checking
  • I though I knew... As your vocabulary grows, you will understand more and more - you are able to decode new German sentences in your head. But as you know, decoding and translation aren't identical and contain different kinds of information. Sometimes the decoding only allows you to get a vague idea of what is meant with a sentence and even the context cannot eliminate all uncertainties. And in some cases, the decoding seems to be very unambiguous, but actually the translation differs a lot. So it's worth having a close look at the regular translation, because it shows you the actual meaning of what is said and makes you link the sentences you learn to the right kind of situation. Listen to the fast audio recording while reading the English translation only. Pause from time to time.
    3 minutes listening and reading
  • Pick 7 sentences or more that you find particularly useful and practice them three times each with the slow and fast audio recording!
    3 minutes speaking
  • Do the listening and translation exercises. And don't forget to read out loud every sentence after having filled the gaps!
    6 minutes studying
  • Today's notes give you a helpful overview of the plural and dative forms.
    5 minutes reading and speaking

Did you know? You can download the mp3s to practice on the go on the Project 1 page.

Parallel Text

Use the player buttons to switch between fast and slow audio recordings. The following transcript is clickable. Click on any sentence to jump to that point in the video. Click to hide.

Ein Mann steht im Garten. Er heißt Herr Schmidt. Herr Schmidt und Frau Schmidt haben ein süßes Baby, einen Jungen, Anton. Paul kommt heute mit einem Mädchen in Herrn Schmidts Garten. Die Jugendlichen/Teenager stehen zusammen im Garten. Herr Schmidt sieht sie.
„Paul, da bist du ja! Grüß dich, Paul!“
„Hallo, Herr Schmidt! Guten Morgen!“
While the girl is picking flowers, Mr. Schmidt talks to Paul.
„Seid ihr zusammen? Wie heißt sie?“
Herr Schmidt lacht.
„Ja. Wir sind zusammen. Sie heißt Anja.“
Herr Schmidt spricht mit Anja.
„Woher kommst du, Anja?“
„Ich komme aus Deutschland, aus Stuttgart und wohne allein in Berlin. Mein Baby wohnt zusammen mit meinem Exmann woanders.“
„Du hast ein Baby?“
„Ja.“
Mr. Schmidt can’t believe it, because she looks like she’s only 16, but he doesn’t let his surprise show.
„Toll! Ich habe eine Katze. Sie heißt Nala.“
„Wo ist sie?“
„Sie sitzt immer da drüben! Dort!“
„Ich sehe sie! Sie ist groß! Servus, Nala! Ist sie alt?“
„Ja, sie ist alt.“
„Bekommt sie Babys?“
„Nein."
Herr Schmidt lacht. Er geht ins Haus.
„Auf Wiedersehen, Anja!“
„Bis dann, Herr Schmidt!“
„Wir sehen uns sicher morgen Paul, bis dann!“
„Cool! Bis morgen, Herr Schmidt!“
„Tschüss Anja! Man sieht sich.“
„Tschau!“

Karl wohnt immer noch in Deutschland. Er ist zu Hause. Ihm ist langweilig. Er hat eine alte Frau. Sie kommt aus Deutschland. Frauen können Babys bekommen. Wenn Karls alte Frau noch ein Baby bekommt, dann freut sich Karl.
„(Guten) Abend!“
„Ich bekomme ein Baby!“
„Das ist toll! Ich freue mich!“
„Bis später.“
Karl geht.

Ich sehe sie
Du siehst sie.
Er sieht sie.
Sie sieht ihn.
Es sieht ihn.
Wir sehen ihn.
Ihr seht ihn.
Sie sehen ihn.

Ich gehe mit dir.
Du gehst mit mir.
Er geht mit ihr.
Sie geht mit ihm
Es geht mit ihr.
Wir gehen mit euch.
Ihr geht mit uns.
Sie gehen mit uns.

A man is standing in the garden. His name is Mr. Schmidt. Mr. Schmidt and Ms. Schmidt have a cute baby, a boy, Anton. Paul comes into Mr. Schmidt’s garden with a girl today. The teenangers are standing [together] in the garden. Mr. Schmidt sees them.
“Paul, there you are! {positively surprised} Hello {Southern-Germany}!”
“Hello, Mr. Schmidt. Good morning!”
While the girl is picking flowers, Mr. Schmidt talks to Paul.
“Are you together?” “What’s her name?”
Mr. Schmidt laughs.
“Yes. We are together. Her name is Anja.”
Mr. Schmidt talks to Anja.
“Where are you from, Anja?”
“I'm from Stuttgart and I live alone in Berlin. My baby lives with my ex-husband somewhere else.”
“You have a baby?”
“Yes.”
Mr. Schmidt can’t believe it, because she looks like she’s only 16, but he doesn’t let his surprise show.
“Awesome! I have a cat. Her name is Nala.”
“Where is she?”
“She always sits over there! Right there!”
“I (can) see her! She is big! Hi (Southern Germany) Nala! Is she old?”
“Yes, she is old.”
“Is she going to have kittens [/get babies]?”
“No.”
Mr. Schmidt laughs. He goes into the house.
“Goodbye, Anja!”
“See you later [/until then], Mr. Schmidt!”
“I’m sure we’ll see each other tomorrow, Paul. Until then!”
“Great! See you tomorrow, Mr. Schmidt.”
“Bye Anja! See you around [/One sees each-other].”
“Ciao!”

Karl still lives in Germany. He is at home. He is bored. He has an old wife. She’s from Germany. Women can have babies. If Karl's old wife could still have [/still gets] a baby, [then] Karl would be [/is] glad.
“Good evening!”
“I’m having a baby!”
“That’s great! I’m glad!”
”See you later.“
Karl leaves.

I see her.
You see her.
He sees her.
She sees him.
It sees him.
We see him
You [pl.] see him.
They see him.

I go with you.
You go with me.
He goes with her.
She goes with him/it.
It goes with her.
We go with you [pl.].
You [pl.] go with us.
They go with us.

 

Listening and Writing

click to listen - fill in the gap - click again and speak in chorus with the native speaker.

Ein Mann steht im Garten.

Paul kommt heute mit einem Mädchen in Herrn Schmidts Garten.

Herr Schmidt sieht sie.

Mein Baby wohnt zusammen mit meinem Exmann woanders.“

Wo ist sie?“

„Sie sitzt immer da drüben!

„Wir sehen uns sicher morgen Paul, bis dann!“

Ihm ist langweilig.

Er hat eine alte Frau.

Frauen können Babys bekommen.

Wenn Karls alte Frau noch ein Baby bekommt, dann freut sich Karl.

„Ich bekomme ein Baby!“

Ich gehe mit dir.

Du gehst mit mir.

Er geht mit ihr.

Sie geht mit ihm

Es geht mit ihr.

Wir gehen mit euch.

Ihr geht mit uns.

Sie gehen mit uns.

Translating and Writing

Fill in the gap, then click the English sentence and speak in chorus with the native speaker.

His name is Mr. Schmidt.
Er heißt Herr Schmidt.

Mr. Schmidt and Ms. Schmidt have a cute baby, a boy, Anton.
Herr Schmidt und Frau Schmidt haben ein süßes Baby, einen Jungen, Anton.

The teenangers are standing [together] in the garden.
Die Jugendlichen/Teenager stehen zusammen im Garten.

“Are you together?”
„Seid ihr zusammen?

“What’s her name?”
Wie heißt sie?“

Mr. Schmidt laughs.
Herr Schmidt lacht.

“I'm from Stuttgart and I live alone in Berlin.
„Ich komme aus Deutschland, aus Stuttgart und wohne allein in Berlin.

My baby lives with my ex-husband somewhere else.”
Mein Baby wohnt zusammen mit meinem Exmann woanders.“

I have a cat.
Ich habe eine Katze.

Is she old?”
Ist sie alt?“

“Yes, she is old.”
Ja, sie ist alt.“

“No.”
Nein."

He goes into the house.
Er geht ins Haus.

“Bye Anja! See you around [/One sees each-other].”
„Tschüss Anja! Man sieht sich.“

Karl still lives in Germany.
Karl wohnt immer noch in Deutschland.

He is at home.
Er ist zu Hause.

“That’s great!
„Das ist toll!

I see her.
Ich sehe sie

You see her.
Du siehst sie.

He sees her.
Er sieht sie.

She sees him.
Sie sieht ihn.

It sees him.
Es sieht ihn.

We see him
Wir sehen ihn.

You [pl.] see him.
Ihr seht ihn.

They see him.
Sie sehen ihn.

notes 2

The Plural

The form of the German definite articles (der, die, das) in the plural is always the same: die.

German plural endings are –en (die Frauen– the women), -er (die Männer – the men), -el (die Dschungel-the jungles) and –e (die Probleme-the problems). Look at the basic plural form (nominative) when first learning a new word, forming the different word forms (declension to different cases) is then very easy.

Just remember den …n for the dative.

Den Frauen/Den Männern/… geht es gut.

The accusative is the same as the basic form.

Die Frauen sehen die Männer. The women see the men.

Die Männer sehen die Frauen. The men see the women.

As in English, there are no indefinite articles for the plural, we just say Frauen (women), Männer (men), Babys (babies)… .

„Bekommt sie Babys?“
Frauen können Babys bekommen.

“Is she going to have kittens [/get babies]?”
Women can have babies.

Articles – the dative

The preposition mit is followed by the dative, one of the four cases.

The dative forms of the articles are:

mit einem Mann
mit dem Mann
mit einer Frau
mit der Frau
mit einem Baby
mit dem Baby.
mit Männern
mit den Männern
mit Frauen
mit den Frauen
mit Babys
mit den Babys

with a man
with the man
with a woman
with the woman
with a baby
with the baby
with men
with the men
with women
with the women
with babies
with the babies

Paul kommt heute mit einem Mädchen in Herrn Schmidts Garten.
Mein Baby wohnt zusammen mit meinem Exmann woanders.“

Paul comes into Mr. Schmidt’s garden with a girl today.
My baby lives with my ex-husband somewhere else.”

Personal Pronoun forms: Dative

Read through the following sentence showing using the personal pronouns (I, you…) in the nominative and dative case.

Ich gehe mit dir.
Du gehst mit mir.
Er geht mit ihr.
Sie geht mit ihm
Es geht mit ihr.
Wir gehen mit euch.
Ihr geht mit uns.
Sie gehen mit uns.

I go with you.
You go with me.
He goes with her.
She goes with him/(it).
It goes with her.
We go with you [pl.].
You [pl.] go with us.
They go with us.

Read the sentences again as an example for the conjugation of a regular verb (gehen).

image attribution: emdot https://www.flickr.com/photos/emdot/24415929/

Don't miss any new course material:
get notified when new session or project texts are uploaded

Comments