WRITTEN BY

Jonas @howwedu


CATEGORY

app, project 1

 

Today's activities

  • All in one: Listen to a sentence and try to understand it, then click to repeat and speak in chorus with the native speaker. Check and improve your understanding with the translation and partial decodings. Focus on verb endings and the personal pronoun forms in the Drill section of today's app (Ich warte auf dich...). Repeat sentences that seem particularly useful to you more often.
    8 minutes listening and speaking
  • Do the listening and translation exercises. With more and more and gaps, they are getting more difficult, but remember that we're striving for progress, not perfection here.
    8 minutes studying
  • Some helpful overview of the personal pronoun forms and an introduction to the genitive case.
    5 minutes reading and speaking

Parallel Text

Use the player buttons to switch between fast and slow audio recordings. The following transcript is clickable. Click on any sentence to jump to that point in the video. Click to hide.

Frank, ein Mann aus Europa, aus England, ist heute zu Hause. Frank wartet auf eine Frau. Sie heißt Maike, sie ist sehr nett und hat große Füße. Maike kennt Frank. Sie geht durch Franks Straße und kommt bei Frank vorbei.
In der Nacht gehen Maike und Frank raus in Franks großen Garten. Maike braucht ein Wasser. Ihr ist heiß.
„Hast du ein Wasser für mich?“
„Ja, warte!“
Frank geht ins Haus. Dann kommt er aus dem Haus. Sie stehen im Garten.
„Hier! Besser?“
„Besser!“
Frank spricht mit Maike. Sie liegen im Garten.
„Wie geht es dir und deinen Kindern?“
„Mir geht es gut… Ich bin ein bisschen allein.
Alle meine Kinder, meine kleine Familie… sie wohnen in England, in meinem alten Haus, wo ich geboren bin. Wenn ich hier in Deutschland bin, können sie dort wohnen.“
„Das ist klasse!“
Maike pulls her wallet from her handbag, opens it, and starts crying.
„Maike, hast du finanzielle Probleme?“
„Ja, kannst du mir helfen?”
„Ja, sicher! Ich habe ein gutes Buch. Es kann dir sicher helfen. Du gehst deinen Weg.“
„Das ist nett!“
„Bis morgen!“
„Bis dann!“

„Kann ich vorbeikommen?“
„Du musst vorbeikommen!
Das weißt du!“
„Haha… gut, bis später!“

„Kann ich alleine gewinnen?“
„Nein. Zusammen können wir gewinnen. Ich weiß es!“

Ich warte woanders auf dich.
Du wartest auf mich?
Er wartet da drüben auf sie.
Sie wartet auf den Tod.
Sie wartet auf ihn.
Wir warten auf euch.
Ihr wartet auf uns?
Sie warten auf ihn.

The end of a disaster film…
„Sind sie tot? Nein!!“
„Ja, alle Jugendlichen sind tot. Alle Jungen, alle Mädchen und alle Babys. Herr Müller.“
„Oh nein!” „Das ist das Ende! Das ist das Ende Europas, das Ende der Welt!“

„Du bleibst hier! Hörst du?“

Frank, a man from Europe, from England, is at home today. Frank is waiting for a woman. Her name is Maike, she’s very nice and she has large feet. Maike knows Frank. She goes down Frank’s street and comes to Frank’s place.
At night, Maike and Frank go out into Frank’s big garden. Maike needs some water. She feels hot.
“Do you have some water for me?”
“Yes, hold on a minute!”
Frank goes into the house. Then he comes out of the house. They are standing in the garden.
“Here! (Feel) better?”
“Better!”
Frank is talking to Maike. They are lying in the garden.
“How are you and your children?”
“I’m fine… I feel [/am] a bit lonely (at times). All my children, my little family… they live in England, in my old house, where I was born. They can live there, while I'm here in Germany.”
“That’s awesome!”
Maike pulls her wallet from her handbag, opens it, and starts crying.
“Maike, are you having financial problems?”
“Yes, can you help me?”
“Yes, of course! I have a good book. It can certainly help you. You’ll be on your way [/You go your way].”
“That’s nice!”
“See you tomorrow!”
“See you!”

“Can I come round?”
“You have to come round!
You know that!”
“Haha, all right [/good], see you later!”

“Can I win alone?”
“No. Together we can win. I know it!”

I am waiting for you somewhere else.
You are waiting for me?
He is waiting for her over there.
She is waiting for death.
She is waiting for it [/him].
We are waiting for you [pl.]
You [pl.] are waiting for us?
They are waiting for him.

The end of a disaster film…
“Are they dead? No!!”
“Yes, all the kids are dead. All the boys, all the girls and all the babies, Mr. Müller.”
“Oh no!” “This is the end! This is the end of Europe, the end of the world!”

“You stay here! Got it? [/Hear you (me)?]”

 

Listening and Writing

click to listen - fill in the gap - click again and speak in chorus with the native speaker.

Frank, ein Mann aus Europa, aus England, ist heute zu Hause.

Maike kennt Frank.

Maike braucht ein Wasser.

Frank geht ins Haus.

Sie stehen im Garten.

Hier! Besser?“

Frank spricht mit Maike.

Ich bin ein bisschen allein.

Das ist klasse!“

Das ist nett!“

Kann ich vorbeikommen?“

„Haha… gut, bis später!“

Ich warte woanders auf dich.

Du wartest auf mich?

Er wartet da drüben auf sie.

Sie wartet auf den Tod.

Sie wartet auf ihn.

Translating and Writing

Fill in the gap, then click the English sentence and speak in chorus with the native speaker.

Frank is waiting for a woman.
Frank wartet auf eine Frau.

Her name is Maike, she’s very nice and she has large feet.
Sie heißt Maike, sie ist sehr nett und hat große Füße.

She goes down Frank’s street and comes to Frank’s place.
Sie geht durch Franks Straße und kommt bei Frank vorbei.

At night, Maike and Frank go out into Frank’s big garden.
In der Nacht gehen Maike und Frank raus in Franks großen Garten.

“Do you have some water for me?”
„Hast du ein Wasser für mich?“

“Yes, hold on a minute!”
Ja, warte!“

Then he comes out of the house.
Dann kommt er aus dem Haus.

“How are you and your children?”
„Wie geht es dir und deinen Kindern?“

“I’m fine…
Mir geht es gut

they live in England, in my old house, where I was born.
sie wohnen in England, in meinem alten Haus, wo ich geboren bin.

They can live there, while I'm here in Germany.”
Wenn ich hier in Deutschland bin, können sie dort wohnen.“

“Yes, can you help me?”
Ja, kannst du mir helfen?”

I have a good book.
Ich habe ein gutes Buch.

“You have to come round!
Du musst vorbeikommen!

“No.
Nein.

Together we can win.
Zusammen können wir gewinnen.

I am waiting for you somewhere else.
Ich warte woanders auf dich.

You are waiting for me?
Du wartest auf mich?

He is waiting for her over there.
Er wartet da drüben auf sie.

She is waiting for death.
Sie wartet auf den Tod.

She is waiting for it [/him].
Sie wartet auf ihn.

We are waiting for you [pl.]
Wir warten auf euch.

You [pl.] are waiting for us?
Ihr wartet auf uns?

They are waiting for him.
Sie warten auf ihn.

“Are they dead? No!!”
Sind sie tot? Nein!!“

All the boys, all the girls and all the babies, Mr. Müller.”
Alle Jungen, alle Mädchen und alle Babys. Herr Müller.“

This is the end of Europe, the end of the world!”
Das ist das Ende Europas, das Ende der Welt!“

“You stay here! Got it? [/Hear you (me)?]”
Du bleibst hier! Hörst du?“

notes 2

Reminder: WO. Adverbials: Time before place

Reminder: it’s time before place.

Frank, ein Mann aus Europa, aus England, ist heute zu Hause.

Frank, a man from Europe, from England, is at home today.

Mir ist heiss

The German equivalent of I feel hot (temperature) is Mir ist heiß (To-me (it) is hot).

It is thus constructed with the dative.

Ihr ist heiß.

She feels hot.

Read through the following sentences using the dative:

Dem Mann ist heiß.
Einem Mann ist heiß.
Den Männern ist heiß.
Männern ist heiß.
Der Frau ist heiß.
Einer Frau ist heiß.
Den Frauen ist heiß.
Frauen ist heiß.
Dem Kind ist heiß.
Einem Kind ist heiß.
Den Kindern ist heiß.
Kindern ist heiß.

Mir ist heiß.
Dir ist heiß.
Ihm ist heiß.
Ihr ist heiß.
Ihm ist heiß.
Uns ist heiß.
Euch ist heiß.
Ihnen ist heiß.

The man feels hot.
A man feels hot.
The men feel hot.
Men feel hot.
The woman feels hot.
A woman feels hot.
The women feel hot.
Women feel hot.
The child feels hot.
A child feels hot.
The children feel hot.
Children feel hot.

I feel hot.
You feel hot.
He feels hot.
She feels hot.
It feels hot.
We feel hot.
You [pl.] feel hot.
They feel hot.

[When referring to attractiveness He/She is hot is simply translated Er/Sie ist heiß, using the basic form of the personal pronouns, i.e. the nominative.]

auf

Warten auf (wait for) is constructed with the accusative. For auf as a plain preposition, the same rule applies as for in: when indicating a location  (auf der Straße – on the street) it is followed by the dative while when referring to a direction, it is followed by the accusative (auf einen Baum klettern - to climb onto a tree).

Ich warte woanders auf dich.
Du wartest auf mich.
Er wartet da drüben auf sie.
Sie wartet auf den Tod. Sie wartet auf ihn.
Wir warten auf euch.
Ihr wartet auf uns?
Sie warten auf ihn.

I am waiting for you somewhere else.
You are waiting for me.
He is waiting for her/them over there.
She is waiting for death. She is waiting for him (or it, as „death“ is masculine).
We are waiting for you [pl.]
You [pl.] are waiting for us?
They are waiting for him.

Read the last sentences again as an example of the conjugation of a regular verb.

The Genitive

The genitive is a form indicating possession or belonging (answering the questions “whose?” or “of what?”).

„Das ist das Ende! Das ist das Ende Europas, das Ende der Welt!“

“This is the end! This is the end of Europe, the end of the world!”

As in English, the typical feature of the genitive is the –s.

But keep in mind that no apostrophes are used in German to form the genitive, unless there already is an –s at the end of the name. In these rare cases, you put only the apostrophe, but not a second –s. E.g. Lukas’(s) mother translates to Lukas Mutter.

Read through the following forms:

Lisas Kind heißt Lukas.
Marios Kind wohnt in Deutschland.
Das Kind des Mann(e)s ist hier.
Das Kind eines Mann(e)s ist hier.
Der Vater des Kind(e)s ist tot.
Der Vater eines Kindes wohnt allein.

The name of Lisa’s child is Lukas.
Mario’s child lives in Germany.
The man’s child is here.
The child of a man.
The father of the child is dead.
The father of a/one child lives alone.

For feminine nouns and in all plural forms, the noun itself does not change, the form is identical to the nominative. The determinate article (the) changes to der, the indeterminate article (a) to einer.

Das Kind der Frau ist zwölf.
Das Haus einer Frau muss groß sein.
Die Kinder der Frauen gehen.
Die Kinder der Männer wohnen in einem Haus.
Die Väter der Kinder warten.

The woman’s child is twelve.
A woman’s house needs to be big.
The women’s children leave.
The men’s children are living in a house.
The children’s fathers are waiting.

image attribution: jiwasz https://www.flickr.com/photos/jiwasz/145051405/

Don't miss any new course material:
get notified when new session or project texts are uploaded

Comments