WRITTEN BY

Jonas @howwedu


CATEGORY

app, project 2

 

Today's activities

  • Challenge yourself. Listen to the fast audio recording first and try to understand as much as you can. Today's text is split into several little stories. The first is coherent and logical while the second one is about a strange and absurd dream. Notice how this affects your understanding when listening for the first time.
    3.5 minutes listening
  • Now switch to the slow audio recording. While you listen, read the German text and check your understanding using the English translation. Repeat difficult sentences.
    6 minutes studying
  • Practice speaking with the fast audio recording and leave out sentences that don't appear to be useful to you.
    5 minutes
  • Proceed to the listening and translation exercises.
    5 minutes studying
  • Read the notes, and keep in mind to focus on the examples, especially when word order is concerned - it is much easier to remember a few sample sentences than grammar explanations and they serve just as well as patterns for other sentences as the generalized rules.
    8 minutes

Parallel Text

Use the player buttons to switch between fast and slow audio recordings. The following transcript is clickable. Click on any sentence to jump to that point in the video. Click to hide.

„Habt ihr euer Auto schon gepackt?“
„Ja, haben wir.“
„Tschüss!“
„Tschau!“
Die Müllers fahren mit dem Auto in den Urlaub. Die Schmidts laufen. Sie laufen… und laufen… und laufen… „Können wir bitte hier an der Seite sitzen bleiben? Wir laufen schon Stunden durch die Stadt.“
„Wir sind doch nicht einmal eine Stunde gelaufen!“
„Dann gib mir den Hausschlüssel und ich gehe nach Hause. Allein.“
„Ihr könnt ja in ein paar Tagen, Wochen oder Monaten kommen, wenn ihr wollt. Ich gehe. Hört ihr?“
Stille. Die Mutter schweigt.
„Marie… kann ich dir helfen? Ist dir langweilig?“
Das Mädchen nickt.
„Ja, ein bisschen. Sind wir bald da?“
„Noch eine Stunde.“
„Können wir denn nicht mit dem Auto in den Urlaub fahren?“
„Nein! Zu Fuß ist doch besser. Du siehst hier alle Straßen, durch die wir laufen, siehst die Gärten, siehst Europa, siehst die Erde … Mit deiner Familie! Eigentlich ist das doch viel besser als mit dem Auto.“
„Ich will mit euch zu Hause bleiben, solange ihr Urlaub habt, weil das viel cooler ist. In der Zeit können wir zusammen spielen, nur bitte nicht immer nur laufen!“
„Mhm… (jaja...)“
Die Schmidts laufen… und laufen… und laufen.

Melissa tells her friend about an odd dream she had last night:
„Ich habe einen toten Mann mit einem Buch im Dschungel gesehen! Er hat mich angesprochen: ‚Herzlich willkommen. Mir ist heiß! Ich brauche ein Wasser!‘
Da bin ich stehen geblieben.
‚Hallo?! Du bist doch tot?!‘
‚Nein, bin ich nicht. Du bist ja nett.‘
‚Entschuldige!‘“, ich freue mich: Der alte Mann ist nicht tot.
‚Bist du im Dschungel geboren?‘
‚Ja, ich wohne schon immer hier/ich habe schon immer hier gewohnt. Ich habe ein Haustier, eine Katze. Sie liegt da drüben, vor dem Auto.‘
‚Du hast ein Auto im Dschungel?‘
‚Ja, das sieht man doch!‘
‚Darf ich damit fahren? Bitte!‘
‚Hast du denn Füße?‘
‚Ja?! Sicher habe ich Füße.‘
‚Ja dann, herzlich willkommen!‘“

‚Oh, ist deine Katze tot?‘
‚Nein, ist sie nicht!?? Hast du ein Problem mit dem Tod??!‘“

Ich habe mein Auto gepackt.
Hast du dein Auto schon gepackt?
Er hat sein Auto gepackt.
Sie hat ihr Auto gepackt.
Wir haben unser Auto gepackt.
Habt ihr euer Auto schon gepackt?
Sie haben ihr Auto gepackt.

“Have you already packed your car?”
“Yes, we have.”
“Bye!”
“Bye!”
The Müllers are going on vacation in their car. The Schmidts are walking. They are walking… and walking… and walking… “Can we please remain seated here, on the side? We’ve already been walking around the city for hours.“ “But we haven’t even been walking for an hour!“ “Then give/hand me the house key and I’ll go home. By myself [/Alone].”
“You can come in a few days, weeks, or months, when(ever) you like. I am leaving! You hear me?”
Silence. The mother is quiet. “Marie… can I help you? Are you bored?”
The girl nods.
“Yes, a bit. Are we almost [/soon] there?”
“Another hour.”
“But can’t we go on holiday by car?”
“No! It’s better on foot {insisting}. This way [/here], you see all the streets that we walk through, you see the gardens, you see Europe, see the Earth … With your family! It’s actually much better than by car.”
“I want to stay at home with you for as long as you are on vacation [/have vacation-time], because that is a lot cooler! During that time we can play together, [just] please, let’s not always only walk!”
“Mhm… okay, okay… [/yesyes] {annoyed}”
The Schmidts walk… and walk… and walk.

Melissa tells her friend about an odd dream she had last night:
“I saw a dead man with a book in the jungle! He talked to me:
‘[Heartfelt] Welcome! I’m hot! I need a water!’
So [/There] I stopped [/stayed standing].
‘Hello?! You’re dead, aren’t you!? {shock}’
‘No, I am not. Aren’t you sweet! [/You are {positive-surprise, ironic} nice!].’
‘I am sorry!’ I am glad: The old man is not dead. ‘Were [/Are] you born in the jungle?’
‘Yes, I’ve always lived here. I have a pet, a cat. She is lying over there, in front of the car.’ ‘You have a car in the jungle?’
‘Yes. Obviously. [That sees one {annoyance}!]’
‘Can I drive it? Please!’
‘Do you have feet [interested]?’
‘Yes?! Of course I have feet!’
‘Well [then], welcome!’
‘Oh, is your cat dead?’
‘No, she is not!?? Do you have a problem with death?’”

I have packed my car.
Have you already packed your car?
He packed his car.
She packed her car.
We have packed our car.
Have you [plural] already packed your car?
They packed their car.

 

Listening and Writing

click to listen - fill in the gap - click again and speak in chorus with the native speaker.

Habt ihr euer Auto schon gepackt?“

Tschau!“

Die Müllers fahren mit dem Auto in den Urlaub.

Die Schmidts laufen.

Sie laufenund laufenund laufen

„Dann gib mir den Hausschlüssel und ich gehe nach Hause.

Hört ihr?“

Ist dir langweilig?“

Mit deiner Familie!

„Ich habe einen toten Mann mit einem Buch im Dschungel gesehen!

Er hat mich angesprochen:

Translating and Writing

Fill in the gap, then click the English sentence and speak in chorus with the native speaker.

“Yes, we have.”
„Ja, haben wir.“

“Can we please remain seated here, on the side?
Können wir bitte hier an der Seite sitzen bleiben?

We’ve already been walking around the city for hours.“
Wir laufen schon Stunden durch die Stadt.“

“But we haven’t even been walking for an hour!“
Wir sind doch nicht einmal eine Stunde gelaufen!“

“You can come in a few days, weeks, or months,
„Ihr könnt ja in ein paar Tagen, Wochen oder Monaten kommen,

I am leaving!
Ich gehe.

“Yes, a bit.
Ja, ein bisschen.

Are we almost [/soon] there?“
Sind wir bald da?“

“But can’t we go on holiday by car?”
„Können wir denn nicht mit dem Auto in den Urlaub fahren?“

It’s better on foot {insisting}.
Zu Fuß ist doch besser.

This way [/here], you see all the streets that we walk through, you see the gardens, you see Europe, see the Earth …
Du siehst hier alle Straßen, durch die wir laufen, siehst die Gärten, siehst Europa, siehst die Erde …

“I want to stay at home with you
Ich will mit euch zu Hause bleiben,

for as long as you are on vacation [/have vacation-time],
solange ihr Urlaub habt,

because that is a lot cooler!
weil das viel cooler ist.

During that time we can play together,
In der Zeit können wir zusammen spielen,

[just] please, let’s not always only walk!”
nur bitte nicht immer nur laufen!“

I’m hot! I need a water!’
Mir ist heiß! Ich brauche ein Wasser!‘

So [/There] I stopped [/stayed standing].
Da bin ich stehen geblieben.

You’re dead, aren’t you!? {shock}’
Du bist doch tot?!‘

‘No, I am not.
Nein, bin ich nicht.

Aren’t you sweet! [/You are {positive-surprise, ironic} nice!].’
Du bist ja nett.‘

The old man is not dead.
Der alte Mann ist nicht tot.

‘Yes, I’ve always lived here.
‚Ja, ich wohne schon immer hier/ich habe schon immer hier gewohnt.

‘Can I drive it?
Darf ich damit fahren?

Please!’
Bitte!‘

‘Yes?! Of course I have feet!’
‚Ja?! Sicher habe ich Füße.‘

‘Oh, is your cat dead?’
‚Oh, ist deine Katze tot?‘

I have packed my car.
Ich habe mein Auto gepackt.

Have you already packed your car?
Hast du dein Auto schon gepackt?

He packed his car.
Er hat sein Auto gepackt.

She packed her car.
Sie hat ihr Auto gepackt.

We have packed our car.
Wir haben unser Auto gepackt.

Have you [plural] already packed your car?
Habt ihr euer Auto schon gepackt?

They packed their car.
Sie haben ihr Auto gepackt.

notes 10

The Perfekt

Perfekt: use

The German Perfekt (Ich habe gesehen. I have seen) is a very practical tense for learners of German:

The forms are very similar to the English ones, and in spoken German the Perfekt is not only equivalent to the English perfect (he has seen ) , but usually also to the English simple past (he saw) and the past progressive (he was seeing). Only for some very common verbs, such as the auxiliary verbs sein (to be), haben (have), müssen (to need to), dürfen (to be allowed to) and können (can) irregular forms of the Präteritum – the German counterpart of the simple past forms (was, had, needed, …) are more common then their perfect forms.

Hence, in spoken German, you normally don’t have to ponder on which past tense to pick – it’s usually the Perfekt.

Perfekt: forms

The forms of the German tense Perfekt are mostly analogous to those of the English present perfect:

Ich habe gesehen. – I have seen.

Du hast gesehen. – You have seen

„Ich habe einen toten Mann mit einem Buch im Dschungel gesehen!
Er hat mich angesprochen:

“I saw a dead man with a book in the jungle!
“He talked to me:

For verbs that refer to movements (gehen - to go, laufen - to walk, bleiben - to stay) or changes (werden – to become, verschwinden – to disappear), however, the forms of haben (have) are replaced by a form a sein (to be).

„Wir sind doch nicht einmal eine Stunde gelaufen!“

“But we haven’t even been walking for an hour!“

Bist du im Dschungel geboren?‘

‘Were [/Are] you born in the jungle?’

Da bin ich stehen geblieben

So [/There] I stopped [/stayed standing].

Liegen (to lie), stehen (to stand) and sitzen (to sit) can be formed with both haben (North Germany) and sein (South Germany, Austria, and Switzerland).

WO. Perfekt

Note that in the sentence structure, the auxiliary haben (to have) or sein (to be) is placed at the regular verb position and the past participle is placed after all the objects and adverbials at the end of the sentence.

subject - have/sein -object- past participle .

You can compare this to the way sentences with other auxiliaries like können (can), dürfen (to be allowed to) and müssen (to need to) are constructed.

subject - can /…- object- verb .

Er spricht mich an.
Er kann mich ansprechen .
Er hat mich angesprochen :

He talks to me.
He can talk to me.
He talked to me:

PP. doch – impatience, annoyance, shock

Note that German doch used as a conjunction equivalent to but at the beginning of a sentence is predominantly found in the written language. Using it at the beginning of a sentence when speaking would indicate a rather elevated register.

Offiziell ist alles gut, doch meine Familie hat finanzielle Probleme.

Officially, everything is fine, but my family has financial problems.

A more natural to say but at the beginning of a sentence is aber, which will be introduced soon.

In the spoken language, doch it is used as a particle expressing among others impatience or annoyance, which can translate differently into English.

‚Ja, das sieht man doch!‘

‘Yes. Obviously {annoyed}. [/That sees one {annoyance}!]

„Wir sind doch nicht einmal eine Stunde gelaufen!“

But {=annoyed} we haven’t even been walking for an hour!“

In intonation questions, i.e. questions with the word order of a usual main clause, it expresses that assumptions are about to be overthrown, often implying shock

Du bist doch tot?!‘

You’re dead, aren’t you!? {shock}

WO. Negation

German nicht alone expresses negation, there are no constructions comparable to English don’t or does not necessarily.

Have a look at the position of nicht (not) in the following sentences:

It is placed behind the verb .

Der alte Mann ist nicht tot.

The old man is not dead.

In composite constructions using auxiliaries, Ich bin nicht gelaufen (I have not walked), Ich kann nicht laufen (I cannot walk) it is placed after the auxiliary, just as in English.

Wir sind doch nicht einmal eine Stunde gelaufen !“

“But we haven’t even been walking for an hour!“

In the corresponding questions however, its position is behind the subject.

Können wir denn nicht mit dem Auto in den Urlaub fahren ?“

“But can’t we go on holiday by car?”

WO. Nein, bin ich nicht! No I am not!

Note that in German, short objections like Nein, bin ich nicht (No, I am not) show an inversion of the subject and the verb.

‚Nein, bin ich nicht.
‚Nein, ist sie nicht!??

‘No, I am not.
‘No, she is not!??

PP. ja – irony

Remember that the particle ja can express positive surprise:

„Dein Garten ist ja ein Dschungel!“

"Your garden is [yes] a jungle!"

It is frequently used in ironic commentaries and then, of course, expresses the opposite.

Du bist ja nett.‘

Aren’t you sweet! [/You are {positive-surprise, ironic} nice!].’

image attribution: Rolands Lakis https://www.flickr.com/photos/rolandslakis/95786377/

Don't miss any new course material:
get notified when new session or project texts are uploaded

Comments