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Epic App I

Epic App I

Epic App I

App 8

App 8

All in one: Listen to a sentence and try to understand it, then click to repeat and speak in chorus with the native speaker. Check and improve your understanding with the translation and partial decodings. Focus on verb endings and the personal pronoun forms in the Drill section of today's...

Session 8

Session 8

“The dictionary is based on the hypothesis - obviously an unproven one - that languages are made up of equivalent synonyms.”  
― Jorge Luis Borges

App 7

App 7

Start speaking in chorus right away with the slow audio recording. While working your way through the text use the pause and repeat functions, even in the case of minor uncertainties. Make sure that ...

Session 7

Session 7

“Knowing trees, I understand the meaning of patience. Knowing grass, I can appreciate persistence.” - Hal Borland

App 6

App 6

Listen to the fast audio recording while reading the German text. Repeat sentences that are more complex to gain complete understanding...

Session 6

Session 6

❝To have another language is to possess a second soul.❞
‒ Charlemagne

App 5

App 5

Listen to the fast audio recording and read the German text. Pause from time to time to check your understanding using the...

Session 5

Session 5

“Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm.” - Winston Churchill

App 4

App 4

Challenge yourself and get immediate feedback: Listen to the fast audio recording and try to understand as much as possible. Pause every 4-5 sentences or so to read through the German text and its translation. Start now and use the sidebar to get back to the instructions...

Session 4

Session 4

No matter how slow you go, you are still lapping everybody on the couch.

Cheat Sheet I

 

a)        Saying hello

Hallo!
Guten Morgen! (Morgen!)
Guten Abend! (Abend!)
Grüß dich/Gott!
Servus!
Tschüss!
Tschau!
(Auf) Wiedersehen!
Bis später!
Bis morgen!
Bis dann!

Hello!
good; Good morning! (Morning!
Good evening! (Evening!)
Saying hello in South Germany. [Greet you/God!]
Saying hello or goodbye in South Germany.
Bye!
Ciao!
Goodbye! [On Again-Seing!]
See you later! [Until later!]
See you tomorrow! [Greet you/God!]
See you! [Until then!]

As  in English, there are quite a few different ways to say hello and goodbye and there are many more  regional differences than shown here (for a  more complete list, click here), but these examples are probably the most common and most important ones. You should get familiar with them, they are all used very frequently. (Hallo and Tschüss being the most universal ones).

b)       Welcoming someone

Willkommen!
Herzlich willkommen!
Willkommen zu Hause!
Willkommen in …!

Welcome!
Heartfelt welcome!
Welcome home!
Welcome in…!

c)        What’s your name?

Wie heißt du?
Wie heißen Sie?

What’s your name? [How are-called you?]
What’s your name {polite}? [How are-called They?]

d)       How are you?

Wie geht’s? (Wie geht’s dir?)
Wie geht es Ihnen?

How are you? [How goes it to you?]
How are you {polite}? [How goes it to Them?]

e)        Where are you from?

Wo kommst du her?/Woher kommst du?
Wo kommen Sie her?/Woher kommen Sie?

Where are you from?
Where are you {polite} from? [/Where come They from?]

f)         Happy!

Das freut mich!

That’s great! [That pleases me!] among adults, a bit formal.

g)        Not so happy!

Mir ist langweilig.
Ist dir langweilig?
Ein bisschen.

I am bored.
Are you bored?
A bit.

h)       Incredible!

Immer noch?!

Still?!

i)         Meeting:

Bist du allein?
Bist du allein zu Hause?
Sind Sie allein zu Hause?
Kommst du zu Jannik?
Kommst du allein?
Kommen Sie zu Herrn Schmidt?
Kommen Sie allein?
Gehst du zu Anne?
Gehen Sie zu Frau Stern?

Are you alone?
Are you alone at home?
Are you {polite} alone at home?
Are you coming to Jannik’s?
Are coming alone?
Are you {polite} coming to Mr Schmidt’s?
Are you [polite] coming alone?
Are you going to Anne’s?
Are you going to Ms. Stern?

j)         Lost somewhere:


Siehst du mich?
Ich sehe dich.
Seht ihr mich?
Wir sehen dich.
Ah, ich sehe euch.

Wo bist du?
Wo sind Sie?
Ich bin hier.


(Can) you see me?
I (can) see you.
(Can) you [pl.] see me?
We (can) see you.
I (can) see you [pl.]?

Where are you?
Where are you [polite]?
I am here.

k)       Yes/No/…

Ja.
Nein.
Ein bisschen.

Yes.
No.
A bit.

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App 3

App 3

Today's activities...

Session 3

Session 3

Don't watch the clock; do what it does. Keep going...

App 2

App 2

WRITTEN BY

Jonas @howwedu


CATEGORY

app, project 1

 

Today's activities

  • Challenge yourself. Listen to the fast audio recording first and try to understand as much as you can. You're able to get a few words, or even sentences? You should be proud of yourself!
    1.5 minutes listening
  • Now switch to the slow audio recording. While you listen, read the German text and check your understanding using the English translation. Repeat difficult sentences.
    3 minutes studying
  • Now it's time for speaking! Practice once with the slow audio recording, then pick 5 useful sentences that you repeat more often.
    5 minutes
  • Go to the listening and translation exercises.
    5 minutes studying
  • Read the notes, if you think they might be helpful today. You think you'll have difficulties to remember them? Just repeat the example sentences 2-3 times in chorus with the native speaker. That's much more better than learning any grammar rule by heart.
    4 minutes

Did you know? Getting into different roles while you're speaking help you remember. Parrot the native speaker, exaggerate!

Parallel Text

Use the player buttons to switch between fast and slow audio recordings. The following transcript is clickable. Click on any sentence to jump to that point in the video. Click to hide.

Anne is sitting in a coffee shop, she sees a woman and starts talking to her.
„Wie heißt du?“
„Anne, und du?“
„Ich heiße Nathalie.“
„Woher kommst du?/Wo kommst du her?“
„Ich komme aus Deutschland. Und du?“
„Ich komme aus Deutschland.“
„Wohnst du in Deutschland?“
„Ja. Und du?“
„Ja.“
„Dann hast du sicher ein Haus hier?“
„Ja, ich wohne allein in einem Haus. Und du?“
„Mmm… Ich bekomme ein Haus.“
„Du bekommst ein Haus?“
„Ja. Frau Schmidt (Anne points to a woman sitting at another table) hat ein altes Haus.“
„Das bekommst du? Bist du dir sicher?“
„Ja, ich bin mir sicher, ich kann es haben.“
Nathalie geht.
Anne’s friend Daniel enters the coffee shop. Three months ago, he told her that he’d move to Austria. But apparently, his plans have changed…
„Daniel, bist du es? Du bist hier, in Deutschland?“
„Ja, ich bin immer noch in Deutschland. Ich wohne immer noch hier in Berlin und ich bleibe hier.“
At home, Anne plays hide and seek with her daughter.
„Kannst du mich sehen?“
„Ich sehe dich.“
„Wie kannst du mich sehen?“
„Kann ich kommen?“
„Ja, du kannst kommen!“

Wie man ein Haus bekommt.
Wie man eine Frau bekommt.
Wie man sie bekommt, wenn man ein Haus hat.
Ich sehe dich.
Du siehst mich.
Er sieht sie.
Sie sieht es.
Es sieht ihn.
Wir sehen euch.
Ihr seht sie.
Sie sehen uns.

Anne is sitting in a coffee shop, she sees a woman and starts talking to her.
“What’s your name?”
“Anne, what’s yours [/and you?]?”
“My name is Nathalie.”
“Where are you from?”
“I’m from Germany. And you?”
“I’m from Germany.”
“Do you live in Germany?”
“Yes. And you?”
“Yes.”
“Then you surely have a house here!”
“Yes I live alone in a house. And you?”
“Mmm… I’ll get a house.”
“You’ll get a house?”
“Yes. Ms. Schmidt (Anne points to a woman sitting at another table) has an old house.”
“You’ll get that? Are you [to-you] sure?”
“Yes, I am [to-me] sure, I can have it.”
Nathalie leaves.
Anne’s friend Daniel enters the coffee shop. Three months ago, he told her that he’d move to Austria. But apparently, his plans have changed…
“Daniel, is that you [/are you it?]? You are here, in Germany?”
“Yes, I am still in Germany. I still live here in Berlin and I am going to stay here.”
At home, Anne plays hide and seek with her daughter.
“Can you see me?”
“I see you.”
“How can you see me?”
“Can I come?”
“Yes, you can come!”

How to get a house.
How to get a woman.
How to get her when you have a house.
I (can) see you.
You see me.
He sees her.
She sees it.
He sees him.
We see you [pl.].
You see them.
They see us.

 

Listening and Writing

click to listen - fill in the gap - click again and speak in chorus with the native speaker.

„Anne, und du?“

Woher kommst du?/Wo kommst du her?“

Dann hast du sicher ein Haus hier?“

„Ja, ich wohne allein in einem Haus.

Du bekommst ein Haus?“

„Ja. Frau Schmidt (Anne points to a woman sitting at another table) hat ein altes Haus.“

ich kann es haben.“

Daniel, bist du es?

„Ja, ich bin immer noch in Deutschland.

Kannst du mich sehen?“

Wie man ein Haus bekommt.

Ich sehe dich.

Du siehst mich.

Er sieht sie.

Sie sieht es.

Es sieht ihn.

Wir sehen euch.

Ihr seht sie.

Sie sehen uns.

Translating and Writing

Fill in the gap, then click the English sentence and speak in chorus with the native speaker.

“What’s your name?”
Wie heißt du?“

“My name is Nathalie.”
Ich heiße Nathalie.“

“I’m from Germany.
Ich komme aus Deutschland.

And you?”
Und du?“

“Do you live in Germany?”
Wohnst du in Deutschland?“

“Yes. And you?”
„Ja. Und du?“

“Yes.”
Ja.“

“Yes I live alone in a house.
„Ja, ich wohne allein in einem Haus.

Are you [to-you] sure?”
Bist du dir sicher?“

“Yes, I am [to-me] sure,
Ja, ich bin mir sicher,

You are here, in Germany?”
Du bist hier in Deutschland?“

I still live here in Berlin
Ich wohne immer noch hier in Berlin

and I am going to stay here.”
und ich bleibe hier. “

“Can you see me?”
„Kannst du mich sehen?“

“I see you.”
„Ich sehe dich.“

“Can I come?”
Kann ich kommen?“

“Yes, you can come!”
„Ja, du kannst kommen!“

when you have a house.
wenn man ein Haus hat.

I (can) see you.
Ich sehe dich.

You see me.
Du siehst mich.

He sees her.
Er sieht sie.

She sees it.
Sie sieht es.

He sees him.
Es sieht ihn.

We see you [pl.].
Wir sehen euch.

You see them.
Ihr seht sie.

They see us.
Sie sehen uns.

notes 2

Personal Pronoun Forms: Nominative, Accusative

As in English, there are different forms (cases) of personal pronouns. All basic forms (nominative) and the direct-pronoun (accusative) forms (“I see you as” as opposed to “I give it to you” (indirect, dative)) are given in the following sentences:

Ich sehe dich.
Du siehst mich.
Er sieht sie.
Sie sieht es.
Es sieht ihn.
Wir sehen euch.
Ihr seht sie.
Sie sehen uns.

I (can) see you.
You see me.
He sees her.
She sees it.
He sees him.
We see you [pl.].
You see them.
They see us.

sehen (see) - Präsens

Read the sentences again and now pay attention that the verb forms for wir (we) and sie (they) are the same as the infinitive forms and that the form for ihr (you pl.) is the same as for er/sie/es (he/she/it). Also note that there is a vowel change in the second and third person singular.

Ich sehe dich.
Du siehst mich.
Er sieht sie.
Sie sieht es.
Es sieht ihn.
Wir sehen euch.
Ihr seht sie.
Sie sehen uns.

I (can) see you.
You see me.
He sees her.
She sees it.
He sees him.
We see you [pl.].
You see them.
They see us.

The all-round Präsens

Understand that there is no present progressive in German, and that in spoken German, the present forms are also used to talk about the future, much more often than the actual future forms of the verb.

„Mmm… Ich bekomme ein Haus.“
Du bekommst ein Haus?“
Ich wohne immer noch hier in Berlin und ich bleibe hier. “

“Mmm… I’ll get a house.”
You’ll get a house?”
I still live here in Berlin and I am going to stay here.”

WO. Questions

The basic word order in simple German and English questions is the same: Compared to basic sentences, subject and verb are inversed.

verb-subject-object (vs. subject-verb(-object))

Bist du dir sicher?“

“Are you [to-you] sure?”

The word order in German W(h)-questions resembles the English one, too: it’s wh-pronoun–verb–subject.

„Wie heißt du?“
„Woher kommst du?/Wo kommst du her?“

“What’s your name?”
“Where are you from?”

WO. Auxiliaries

The word order in a sentence containing an auxiliary verb like können (can) is a little bit different, if there are objects in the sentence. It’s subject-can/…-object-verb. Objects are placed between the auxiliary and the verb.

„Ja, du kannst kommen!“
„Ja, ich bin mir sicher, ich kann es haben.“

“You can come!”
I’m sure that I can have it.

This also applies to questions.

Wh-cansubject–object –verb.

Kannst du mich sehen?“
„Wie kannst du mich sehen?“
Kann ich kommen?“

“Can you see me?”
“How can you see me?”
“Can I come?”

WO. Adverbs

The usual position of the adverbs is the same as in English: at the end of the sentence. However, it’s time before place, not place before time.

Ich wohne immer noch hier in Berlin und ich bleibe hier. “

I still live here in Berlin and I am going to stay here.”

In sentences using auxiliaries adverbials are usually placed before the verb they refer to.

Ich kann dich noch sehen. [I can still see you.]

WO. Verb Position in Subordinate Clauses

In sentences starting with wenn (when) and in many other subordinate clauses, the verb is placed at the end, behind the object and adverbials (time, place …).

Wie man sie bekommt, wenn man ein Haus hat.

How to get her when you have a house.

How-to expressions

How to do-expressions are translated to German Wie man… (How one…). English translations of man can be one and you: man is used when a statement is general and not applied to someone in particular.

Wie man ein Haus bekommt.
Wie man eine Frau bekommt.
Wie man sie bekommt, wenn man ein Haus hat.

How to get a house.
How to get a woman.
How to get her when you have a house.

image attribution: zoetnet https://www.flickr.com/photos/zoetnet/9524536297

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Session 2

Session 2

peaking the some texts again and again is the key to achieve a natural style of speaking  ...

 

App 1

App 1

The daily apps give you the opportunity to explore the words you've learned in different contexts. They show you that all of your howwedu vocabulary is useful and important.

 

Session 1

Session 1

Welcome to the howwedu 512 German course. howwedu 512 is an intense introductory German course. In 32 learning sessions you will learn 512 German words and get fluent in their use.

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Project Text 1

Project Text 1

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